• Born With It (生まれつき): Short film captures the angst of being a black child in Japan






    An American filmmaker, Emmanuel Osei-Kuffour, from Texas, depicts this struggle to be accepted as a dark skinned black man in Japan in his award winning short film Born With It(生まれつき). Osei-Kuffour lived in Japan for six years, encountering numerous instances of prejudice and discrimination. The film follows a black elementary school child in Japan experiencing the cruelty of racism and harsh words spoken unfiltered in the world of children, who have not learned to cover their racism or fully know the impact of what they are doing or saying.




  • “Eriko’s Facebook Life”/The Amazing Japanese Wife: Part 4






    What I leave out is this: I don’t want children. I’m fine with being a Japanese Wife but I would never want to be a Japanese Mother. I think about sex with Douglas, and a spasm of pain shoots up from the bottom of my spine to the back of my eyes. Mayu-san who has two kids with her husband Michael, told me that unlike Japanese husbands, American men will demand sex after childbirth and fall into black rages if their wives refuse. Mayu-san shrugged and said it was a trade-off but she didn’t specify what she was getting in return. Something she didn’t care to post on Facebook, I guess.







  • Amina Du Jean, Japan’s first black idol, is back with a song “Seppuku”?!






    Our favorite idol (アイドル) in Japan, Amina Du Jean, has new EP out. It’s called “Seppuku”.
    Ritual disembowling (hara-kiri) has never been cuter or had a better melody. Mishima would have danced to this.
    For more on the song and Amina Du Jean, checkout out her Bandcamp website.







  • Heal your heart and body: Find Your Element in Fall 2017






    As much as we love Japan, it’s a stressful place. If you don’t know the language, even more so. And actually, sometimes knowing the language makes it even worse. If you’re looking for some spiritual healing, relaxation, leadership skills and or guidance try attending the Find Your Elements Workshops this coming fall .







  • Good signs: Japan’s APU graduate creates successful deaf cafe in Indonesia






    “Fingertalk” a cafe run by the deaf in Indonesia has become a successful philanthropic business in Indonesia. It owes its success to the experience and determination of Dissa Syakina Ahdanisa, a graduate from Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University (APU). APU is a university located in the famous hot spring city of Japan — Beppu, Oita prefecture. […]




Born With It (生まれつき): Short film captures the angst of being a black child in Japan






An American filmmaker, Emmanuel Osei-Kuffour, from Texas, depicts this struggle to be accepted as a dark skinned black man in Japan in his award winning short film Born With It(生まれつき). Osei-Kuffour lived in Japan for six years, encountering numerous instances of prejudice and discrimination. The film follows a black elementary school child in Japan experiencing the cruelty of racism and harsh words spoken unfiltered in the world of children, who have not learned to cover their racism or fully know the impact of what they are doing or saying.







“Eriko’s Facebook Life”/The Amazing Japanese Wife: Part 4






What I leave out is this: I don’t want children. I’m fine with being a Japanese Wife but I would never want to be a Japanese Mother. I think about sex with Douglas, and a spasm of pain shoots up from the bottom of my spine to the back of my eyes. Mayu-san who has two kids with her husband Michael, told me that unlike Japanese husbands, American men will demand sex after childbirth and fall into black rages if their wives refuse. Mayu-san shrugged and said it was a trade-off but she didn’t specify what she was getting in return. Something she didn’t care to post on Facebook, I guess.







Amina Du Jean, Japan’s first black idol, is back with a song “Seppuku”?!






Our favorite idol (アイドル) in Japan, Amina Du Jean, has new EP out. It’s called “Seppuku”.
Ritual disembowling (hara-kiri) has never been cuter or had a better melody. Mishima would have danced to this.
For more on the song and Amina Du Jean, checkout out her Bandcamp website.