Bitcoin CEO Karpeles Arrested But What Is He Guilty Of?











The Japanese police arrested Mark Karpeles, the CEO of Mt Gox, once the world’s largest bitcoin exchange on Saturday morning for inflating his US accounts. But what is he really guilty of?







Ghost in the Shell: The Matrix of Sci-Fi Anime

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With the newest Ghost in the Shell film in theaters, and a live-action version on the horizon, it’s important to take a look back at what made the original so popular.







The Mysteries of Mt. Gox: An Investigative Series Coming Soon!

Mt.Gox-K.K.










Since that time Mark Karpeles, the former CEO has been the subject of mass scrutiny, accused of being the criminal mastermind of Silk Road, and even the victim on an attempted shakedown by rogue Federal Agents. As a gaggle of reporters gathers outside his door over the last week, as rumours of his arrest fly, Japan Subculture Research Center is at last prepared to an exclusive series on the Mt. Gox story and the world of Bitcoin in Japan.







With “The War Bill” Looming, Japan’s Press & Academia Rebel Against Team Abe

Koichi Nakano










Professors Koichi Nakano, Mari Osawa and Manabu Sato visited the FCCJ on Friday to once again explain why more than 95% of political scholars are against this new bill that would increase Japan’s military capabilities.







Humanities to be Outlawed at Public Universities

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The Japanese government has now decided to systematically remove the teaching of humanities and the fine arts at public universities







This week in Hate Mongering In Japan: Fuji TV wins for Korean mistranslation ‘sans malice’

On a June 5th broadcast, Fuji Television subtitled a Korean woman as saying, "I hate Japan. Didn't they make Korea suffer?" On screen she is actually speaking about Korea and says, "There is much culture here. This seems why many foreigners visit." Fuji apologised for this and other 'misedits'.










Another scene had a Korean man reportedly saying the equivalent of the US racist cliche, “Some of my best friends are black.” In the scene shown, the man is subtitled as saying, “There are some good Japanese people but I hate the country.”
He actually says onscreen, “Japan doesn’t reflect solemnly on past history. That part of Japan, well…..”. According to Fuji Television, in unaired other parts of the interviews, the people said exactly what was shown in the subtitles. Thanks Fuji Television, ambassadors of bad will, because if those nice Korean people didn’t hate Japan before, they probably do now







Japan’s Communist Party Wishes PM Abe Knew Shame or at least the Potsdam Declaration

The war that Japan's leaders want to forget haunts the nation.










On Tuesday, the speaker was Japan Communist Party chairman Kazuo Shii, who in many ways expressed more pacifist sentiments than Natsuo Yamaguchi did for the New Komeito.







Pole Dance Tokyo: A Sophisticated Sexiness

Lu Nagata










Pole dancing is quickly developing a more professional and respected aura around it as a dance form







Anime Jazz: A Japanese Genre that Really Swings

bebop cover










Jazz and anime go together well in Japan—like mayo on Takoyaki. In both “Bebop” and “Kids on the Slope” there’s a visualization of the coolness of jazz that is rarely seen. Even though there are just a handful of anime jazz shows they are worth watching—and hearing.







Japan’s State Secrets Laws Empowers The Elite and Muzzles The Press: FOP RIP 12/10/2014

The Japanese government is looking for a mascot for its oppressive State Secrets Act. This monsters with eyes to monitor the media and hands to arrest them may be ideal--no ears to listen to reason and no mouth to speak secrets--it can only attack.










It allows Japan’s 19 government ministries to designate certain information as state secrets. The state secret classification lasts five years, a period that can be extended to 60 years. Any civil servant that shares the classified secrets and any journalist that works with the leaked information could face up to 10 years of imprisonment. In simple terms, a government employee that leaks a classified secret can receive up to ten years in jail. A reporter or citizen that urges the official to release information or works with the person to do so can be sent to jail for up to five years. In other words, a reporter who aggressively asks about matters deemed secret can go to jail for questions alone.