International Court orders Japan to stop part of its whaling program; Japan wails in protest

Photo: Guillaume Bression / Trois8 / Tokyo-Prod, Wada prt in Minamiboso, Japan

Now that the International Court of Justice has told Japan that in cannot hunt whales as it does now, there is a new concern that the Japanese government will find different ways to prove its whaling is actually for scientific study purposes. And in fact, one worries that as the Japanese government strives to prove they’re correct, the meat taken from the slaughtered whales may just be thrown away without being put on the market, or vanish into darkness (and go into the black market)

Understand Abe & his right wing crew, but focus on Japan. “You’re talking to the wrong people”

shinzo abe

Abe and a slice of Japan’s ruling class believe Japan did a noble deed with its war to throw off the white man’s yoke in Asia and free the colored races (their words, not mine). Moreover, they believe that the Tokyo War Crimes trials were illegitimate, and the Nanjing Massacre and other “alleged wrongdoings” were just that — “alleged.” And, they reason, if Japan did do anything wrong, everybody did such things during the war.

Abe and that small slice of the ruling class believe that as long as Japan accepts this “masochistic” view of history (again, their word, not mine), Japan will never regain its independence and respect – its own self-respect and the respect of other nations.

“If she bleeds, she can’t lead…” Sexist, Pro-nuclear, LDP loyalist Masuzoe Elected Tokyo Governor

The association of women who won't have sex with men who vote for Masuzoe

“Women are not normal when they are on their period. They are abnormal.
You can’t possibly let them make critical decisions about the country [during their periods], such as
whether or not to go to war.” – Masuzoe in the October 1989 issue of the magazine BIGMAN

Japan Passes Draconian Secrecy Bill Into Law: Journalists, Whistleblowers are now “terrorists”

Exposure_150 (2)

Of course, every country has a fundamental right to protect its citizens’
interests and there is an obvious need for some issues relating to national
security to be secret. However, it is the vague definition in the new bill
of what actually constitutes a state secret which potentially gives
officials carte blanche to block the release of information on a vast range
of subjects. In essence, anything which makes a journalist in Japan
even more uncomfortable with exposing wrongdoing, wherever it may exist, is
a worrying development when transparency and openness should be the way
forward.”

Japan’s Secrecy Bill: Designed by Kafka & Inspired by Hitler?!!

Whistleblowers and journalist face up to ten years in jail for exposing anything the Japanese government declares "a special secret." And what is a "special secret"--that is also secret.

Legal experts note that even asking pointed questions about a state secret, whether you know or don’t know it’s a secret, could be treated as “instigating leaks” and the result in an arrest and a possible jail term up to five years. Of course, the trial would be complicated since the judge would not be allowed to know what secret the accused was suspected of trying to obtain.

Japan: Even The Secrecy Bill Briefing Is Secret; Abe-gumi Pushes Ominous Secrecy Bill Towards Law

Thousands of Japanese citizens have been protesting the Secrecy Bill since last week. The response of the ruling party's Shigeru Ishiba was to label them as "terrorists."  (photo by Alissa Toyosaki)

Japan’s Ruling Coalition Government Seeks to Pass Controversial Bill As Fast As Possible While Opposition At Home and Abroad Grows and Support For Abe Government Wanes. Japan’s Secrecy Law, Designed by Kafka and inspired by Hitler.

Japanese rockers sing the truth about post-meltdown Fukushima. Is anyone listening?

Tepco employees facing Fukushima citizens questions

“We’re living in a material world. A radioactive material world, ” jokes the lead singer. “This isn’t the future we hoped for.” They released their second mini-album “Living in a Radioactive Material World” this year. The title song has the punch of early Clash, the vocals on the acoustic song, “アスノメ (the eye of tomorrow) are smoky, poignant and reminiscent of Marianne Faithful–if she had been a protest singer. The live recording of 打ち砕いて (Knock it down) has in the background the enthusiastic cheers from the Fukushima local high school kids, who find their despair voiced in the lyrics of the band.

“What are the criteria of these possible secrets?” “Well…it’s a secret.” Japan’s Kafkaesque Special Secret Protection Bill threatens to destroy freedom of speech

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“this bill represents a great threat to journalism.” A person investigating a state secret and revealing it could be prosecuted and jailed to up to 10 years. The criteria for prosecuting an individual are too vague, she added. “If a journalist or a member of an NGO accidentally overhears a state secret, he/she would be prosecuted. At a point where a person accesses what is designated as a state secret, that person will be prosecuted or indicted for holding that secret.” Fukushima explained that if a lawmaker got hold of a state secret and wants to reveal it, he/she could also be prosecuted.

Charity Flea Market for Tohoku November 17 (Tokyo): volunteer, shop, help :D

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IMA, a Tokyo-based group that welcomes volunteers of all ages, Japanese and international, will sponsor a Fall flea market, bake sale and full day of workshops on 11/17. IMA welcomes everyone, children and adults to join in the fun and festivities and help IMA raise money for a number of projects to support people of Tohoku whose lives were shattered by the Great earthquake, tsunami and Fukushima nuclear disasters of 3/11. A full description of the day’s events can be found on this Facebook page. The Flea Market venue is in downtown Okachimachi– 2-26-8 Taito, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0016

日本外国特派員協会「特定秘密保護法案」に抗議「報道の自由」への脅威と糾弾

特定秘密保護法ブレンド

その上、「特定秘密保護法案」は政府の政策に関する取材でも「不適切な方法」を用いてはならない、とジャーナリストに対する脅し文句も含まれています。これは、報道メディアに対する直接的な威嚇の如しであり、個別のケースにおいて許せないほどに拡大解釈ができるようになっています。