Put Tokyo in your pocket: Lonely Planet’s Pocket Tokyo is a great guide book

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Tokyo is far to big to cover in one short trip, but Lonely Planet’s travel guide to Tokyo shows you the places worth hitting.

Over-Educated, Under-Paid and Most Likely Single: Women in Japan’s Academia

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Japanese academia is crowded with smart, talented women, according to the book Kogakureki Jyoshino Hinkon, but it seems very few in this country have any idea how to welcome or deploy them. All this, and yet in their book the three stress that higher education more often hinders instead of helps the modern Japanese woman attain personal and professional happiness.

What we talk about when we talk about love & sex in Japan

The Japanese language is rich in terms for love and sex--which are definitely not the same thing here.

*浮気 (Uwaki) –1) to describe someone who can romantically love many people 2) infidelity; an affair 3) being in love with in someone other than your partner 4) (old usage) cheerful and gorgeous

Who really wrote Henry Stokes’s revisionist history book? More questions.

The controversial book by Henry S. Stokes. Does it represent his views or those of the extremist "translators" who put it together?

yodo News questions about the last 2 lines of Chapter 5. Henry said his idea is different. I insisted that is my understanding of what he said. After Kyodo interview we discussed the difference and came up with the below statement:

In regards to “Questions surround reporter’s revisionist take on Japan’s history”

The controversial book by Henry S. Stokes. Does it represent his views or those of the extremist "translators" who put it together?

On May 8th, Kyodo News published an article concerning former New York Times Tokyo bureau chief Henry S. Stokes and his recent best-seller 英国人記者が見た連合国戦勝史観の虚妄  (Falsehoods of the Allied Nations’ Victorious View of History, as Seen by a British Journalist).  The Kyodo News article raised questions about the veracity of the book and whether it really [...]

Outsiders Amongst Outsiders’: A Cultural Criminological Perspective on the Sub-Subcultural World of Women in the Yakuza Underworld

Rie Alkemade  Abstract: This research explores a lesser-known aspect of the infamous yakuza subculture: the wives. Implementing a triangulation of methods and embracing a cultural criminological perspective, this thesis aims to discover the roles, influences, and positions of these women in this overly patriarchal criminal society. Traveling across the yakuza pyramid, this thesis seeks to [...]

“Nothing says love like menstrual blood.” In Japan, V-Day chocolates are really special

Love, blood, chocolate and a love hotel is all you need. Happy Valentine's Day in Japan!

Well, some women in Japan, and probably a very small number of them, in order to spice up their home-made chocolates with a little extra something, or give their store bought chocolates something really special–are reportedly (self-reportedly) putting a little of their own blood and sweat into the cooking of gooey sweets

The Tears of a Cat: Hello Kitty’s Guide to Japan, English and Japanese/ ハローティの英語で紹介する

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There’s something incredibly moving about a single tear dribbling from the tiny eyes of Hello Kitty; her lack of a mouth even makes it all the more poignant

Japan Passes Draconian Secrecy Bill Into Law: Journalists, Whistleblowers are now “terrorists”

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Of course, every country has a fundamental right to protect its citizens’
interests and there is an obvious need for some issues relating to national
security to be secret. However, it is the vague definition in the new bill
of what actually constitutes a state secret which potentially gives
officials carte blanche to block the release of information on a vast range
of subjects. In essence, anything which makes a journalist in Japan
even more uncomfortable with exposing wrongdoing, wherever it may exist, is
a worrying development when transparency and openness should be the way
forward.”

Japan’s Secrecy Bill: Designed by Kafka & Inspired by Hitler?!!

Whistleblowers and journalist face up to ten years in jail for exposing anything the Japanese government declares "a special secret." And what is a "special secret"--that is also secret.

Legal experts note that even asking pointed questions about a state secret, whether you know or don’t know it’s a secret, could be treated as “instigating leaks” and the result in an arrest and a possible jail term up to five years. Of course, the trial would be complicated since the judge would not be allowed to know what secret the accused was suspected of trying to obtain.